DancewithSpace_1.06.10
dance with space
DancewithSpace47.12
dance with space
_20.06.2016_weave&twine.seq3_34.08
weave & twine
weave&twine_seq4
weave & twine
coil&stretch_seq4_04.12
coil & stretch
coil&stretch_seq3_horizontal
coil & stretch
raise&drop_op
raise & drop
rais&drop_ned
raise & drop

work meaning

The following reflections are shared with works presented here, drawing on earlier works as well (see CV). The combined ‘body’ of meaning and agencies relate to unlike cultural and societal issues, pointed out and handled by movement-forces – a key driver in space-making producing new meaning.

The project inscribe itself in a tradition, which understands the history of body and architecture as interwoven in alternating relations. This may be exemplified by the ‘ideal body’ regulated by geometry we know from Vitruvius and the Renaissance till today, where the ideal body gives way for different floating and shifting relations in body-world-media. Four reflection-concepts are in focus:

Gesture-modelsMaking contemporary body-world rhythms appear and operative, all my works are set up and presented as gesture-models. This term refers to the French philosopher Jean-Francois Lyotard and his publication ‘Gestus’, where he describes the various elements of aesthetic production and reception. Together they constitute a model of ‘gestural exchange’. Correspondingly, Giorgio Agamben views gesture as being ‘an exhibition of mediality’: i.e. a process of making means visible as such, operating with gesture, not as limited to movement of the body, but including moves constituted by camera, light, editing, object, design – and involving gestures of spectators. 

Image-actsConcepts of image-acts are involved in gesture-modelling as well, pointing out that, through their own potencies, image/drawing/model generates every sort of experience and action related to perception and embodiment. Body-image has implications for culture and society, operating not only as a picture of the body, but as an anticipatory plan for detailed movements a body must undertake in order to act and project subjective perspectives onto the field of shared intersubjective possibilities in a community. Also, experience of one’s body-image and corporeal schema is neither fixed or rigid, but adaptable to the myriad of embodied tools and technologies. Along with the image of the body as distinct from all other images, stated with ‘I do not only know it from without by perception, but also from within by affection’. 

Computation. The last twenty year’s use of computation in the architectural process have fostered a design-thinking dominated by form-making rather than space-making. Eventually, joining ‘the spatial turn’, focus in design-computing now is on dynamic spatial and user-centered optimization. Meanwhile, questions and ethical aesthetic weighing of what is relevant to optimize are often not in focus, when making use of massive amounts of data to optimize every area of cognitive and behavioral ecology and spatial and social dynamics in buildings and cities. Even so, essentially depending on the use of computation, my work is at dialogue with an emerging field that searches to expand perceptual and ethical aesthetic meaning in spatial imaging.

To render. An aim of my project is to render movement-forces visible, not to render the visible. To map and work with movement-forces, we have to transform forces into an abstract material, into topological figures open for operation. Hereby, we can create a first passage from the normal to a grotesque or skewed movement. This kind of passages may cross other barriers as well, being social, natural-cultural or everyday-life vs. artistic effects. In ‘Philosophy of dance’, Poul Valery argues that dance is a physical discipline constantly engaged with pedestrians. He provides a model of dance both grounded in the actualities of the everyday body, but also operating as an alternative born of excess and aberrancy, accommodating the potential for new categories of movement.

ConclusionMy works and this website search to evoke body-spatial meaning, qualifying feelings of inclusion or exclusion, for example. But more so, they seek to catalyse participants into virtual dancers, to involve agency of rhythm, which isn’t about content but about feeling of movement in gathering. Making intervals of space emanate from rhythmic forces, provoked by movement-excess, the project potentially transgresses cultural divergence, opening up sensation and experience about art-of-shared-space.

litrature